LBCE- LITHOANIAN BEACH STONE CAIRN PENDANT NECKLACE & EARRINGS SET

$29.95

 

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Description

ABOUT THIS PIECE…

THIS IS A CAIRN NECKLACE AND EARRINGS SET MADE WITH BEACH STONES FROM LITHOANIA AND A CERAMIC ELEPHANT TOPS EACH CAIRN.

ITEM DETAILS…

EARRINGS Measure Approximately 3/4″ Long Including Hook by 1/2” at Widest.

NECKLACE Chain is Approximately 17” Long

PENDANT Including Bail is Approximately 1-3/4” Long by 5/8” at Widest.

TIDBITS FOR MAGICAL THINKERS…

The building of cairns for various purposes goes back into prehistory in Eurasia, ranging in size from small rock sculptures to substantial man-made hills of stone (some built on top of larger, natural hills). Cairn originally could more broadly refer to various types of hills and natural stone piles, but today is used exclusively of artificial ones and they are used to mark one’s path when on a journey.
Burial cairns and other megaliths are the subject of a variety of legends and folklore throughout Britain and Ireland. In Scotland, it is traditional to carry a stone up from the bottom of a hill to place on a cairn at its top. In such a fashion, cairns would grow ever larger. An old Scottish Gaelic blessing is “I’ll put a stone on your stone”. In Highland folklore it is believed that the Highland Clans, before they fought in a battle, each man would place a stone in a pile. Those who survived the battle returned and removed a stone from the pile. The stones that remained were built into a cairn to honor the dead.
In Scandinavia, cairns have been used for centuries as trail and sea marks, among other purposes. In Iceland, cairns were often used as markers along the numerous single-file roads or paths that crisscrossed the island; many of these ancient cairns are still standing, although the paths have disappeared.
In the mythology of ancient Greece, cairns were associated with Hermes, the god of overland travel. According to one legend, Hermes was put on trial by Hera for slaying her favorite servant, the monster Argus. All of the other gods acted as a jury, and as a way of declaring their verdict they were given pebbles, and told to throw them at whichever person they deemed to be in the right, Hermes or Hera.
In Portugal a cairn is called a moledro. Legend states that the moledros are enchanted soldiers, and if one stone is taken from the pile and put under a pillow, in the morning a soldier will appear for a brief moment, then will change back to a stone and magically return to the pile.
Cairns that mark the place where someone died or cover the graves alongside the roads where in the past people were buried. In the Galician legends, the Cairns represent spirits of the night, called, “Fes” or “Fieis” which is also thought to mean fairy, the same root as “fate” (fado), that can take the same meaning as the proto-Celtic *bato-, meaning “death”
Cairns are also common on the Mediterranean island of Corsica